A Corpse In A Trunk
Steele Scrapbook - May 1, 1885

A CORPSE IN A TRUNK.



THE HORRIBLE DISCOVERY MADE BY A BAGGAGE MASTER.


THE REMAINS OF A MAN FOUND PACKED TIGHTLY IN A TRUNK WITH NO CLUE TO THE PERPETRATORS OF THE DEED—IS IT ANOTHER MAXWELL-PRELLER TRAGEDY?

PITTSBURG, May 1.—This evening about 6 o'clock, Baggage Master Jenkins at the Union Depot, upon bursting open a trunk which gave out a suspicious odor, was horrified to find therein the body of a man securely bound and in an advanced state of decomposition. The face was badly discolored and bloated, and the stench was so great that it kept at a safe distance the large crowd which quickly gathered. The trunk arrived here from Chicago on the morning express, and was checked 4171, but no person called to claim it. The baggage master noticed a peculiar smell when it was unloaded from the train this morning, but no attention was paid to it until this evening, when the stench became unbearable. After consultation, the railroad officials decided to open it, and the result was the ghastly discovery. The body, in order to get it into the trunk, had been bent almost double. Around the neck, arms and legs was heavy cord about one-eighth of an inch in thickness, which had been drawn so tight that it had cut deep into the flesh. There were no marks of violence and, so far as could be ascertained from an outward examination, the stomach was in a normal condition. The body was that of a laboring man. There was nothing on his person that would furnish any clue to his identity except an International money order in favor of Filippo Caruso, for $23.45. The order was drawn at Chicago on February 24, 1885. The Coroner is holding an investigation. He is of the opinion that the remains were in the trunk at least 36 hours.



FOLLOW-UP STORY: MAY 7, 1885

A CORPSE IDENTIFIED.

PITTSBURG, May 7.—The body of a man received here in a trunk last week has been positively identified by Francisco Carousa as the remains of his brother.

THE MURDERER ARRESTED.

NEW YORK, May 7.—Agiostino Jurado, an Italian, was arrested here last night on suspicion of being the murderer of the man found in a trunk at Pittsburg last week. To-day the Chicago baggage master who checked the trunk unhesitatingly picked Jurado out as the man who brought the trunk to the station. The prisoner refused to make any statement but willingly agreed to return to Chicago.



FOLLOW-UP STORY: MAY 8, 1885

THE PITTSBURG TRUNK MYSTERY.


ARREST OF FIVE SICILIANS IN CHICAGO—PROBABLY THE RIGHT CLUE TO THE CRIME.

CHICAGO, May 8.—Augustine Comanto, Antonio Camirito, John Azzeo, and Sylvestine and Bove Ingnazio, were arrested here yesterday for complicity in the murder of Fillipo Caruso, whose corpse was sent to Pittsburg in a trunk. The three last named are the men who lived at the place where the murdered man was last seen, a week ago Thursday. The men are all Sicilians of the lowest class and can speak no English. The men Camirito and Comanto are respectively husband and brother to the woman Victoria Camirito, who has been arrested in New York. These men were arrested on evidence furnished by Mamie Cachett, a little girl who saw Fillipo Caruso enter the house occupied by the three suspects above named, and about an hour afterward saw a man enter the house with a trunk on his shoulder. Her description of this trunk leaves little doubt that it is the one in which the unfortunate Caruso was shipped to Pittsburg. The man Gilardo, arrested in New York a day or two ago, and who followed the trunk and its ghastly contents to Pittsburg, thence continuing his trip East, is regarded by the police here as beyond a doubt one of the men present at the murder of Caruso, if not the instigator of the crime.



FOLLOW-UP STORY: MAY 11, 1885

CHICAGO'S TRUNK MYSTERY.


JURADO, THE ITALIAN ARRESTED IN NEW YORK, MAKES A CONFESSION.

CHICAGO, May 11.—Jurado Augustine, the Sicilian, who was brought back from New York by Detective Bonfield, to answer to the charge of murdering Filippo Caruso, the man who was found dead in a trunk at Pittsburg, is now locked up at the Central Station. Last evening Jurado was taken from his cell and conducted to the private office of Lieutenants Shea and Kipley. Detective Bonfield and Officer Morris, the Indiana policeman who has done most of the work on the case, were also in the room. Morris speaks Italian fluently, and he at once began interpreting for Jurado the questions asked by Shea and Kipley. Then Morris interpreted the answers to Shea, Kipley, and Bonfield in a loud voice. As the examination progressed it became evident some startling developments were to be made. Jurado, after much questioning, said according to the translation by Morris that he took the trunk to the depot, and also that he left New for York [sic] with Victoria Camirito the next day. When asked whether he knew what was in the trunk he hesitated for some time, and at last endeavored to evade the question. Cornered, he defiantly said he did not know what was in the trunk at the time. More pumping followed, and Juardo [sic] broke down and committed himself in several particulars. Morris spoke lower after that, and what he said could not be heard. When Jurado was at last brought out he was evidently very much frightened. The officers were jubilant, and it was said that the "'Dago had given himself away completely." None of the detectives would say anything further as to the extent of Jurado's confession.



FOLLOW-UP STORY: MAY 12, 1885

THE TRUNK MYSTERY.


THE ITALIAN CARAZO MURDERED FOR HIS MONEY.

CHICAGO, May 12.—The three Italians arrested here for alleged participation in the murder of the Italian lemon peddler, Carazo, practically confessed to the perpetration of the murder this afternoon. They in a measure absolve Jurado, who was arrested in New York on his way to Italy. They state that he witnessed the deed, however, and demanded a share of the money taken from Carazo as the price of his silence, and then aided in shipping the body in the trunk to Pittsburg.



Unceremoniously Stolen From Alf




Dreadful Sentiments...